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Donald M. and Jane Stromquist Residence (1958) (S.429)
 
Exterior Photographs By Douglas M. Steiner, September 2009
There are many classic Wright details. As you approach the home from the street below, the roof cantilevers skyward over the living room and terrace. The living room has two large walls of windows, one floor to ceiling. From the peak over the living room, the roof slants down toward the back of the home. Wright designed these windows to match the slope of the roof. The slope of the windows is not immediately evident, but becomes apparent as your eye follows the slope at the floor. Wright used this window design in only one other home. The Archie Teater Studio. Originally designed in stone, the Stromquists felt it would be to costly. It is designed on a diamond grid consisting of 60 and 120 degree angles. The basic materials are glass, concrete block and mahogany paneling and trim. Wright replaced stone with concrete block and raked only the horizontal joints, leaving the vertical joints flush   with the face of the brick adding to the horizontal impression. The doors are a work of art. They are set within a wall of glass. The top has the same slope as the roof. At first glance, the bottom gives the appearance to be at a slant also, but in reality is straight. All rows of concrete block below the window line are slightly inset so that the wall appears to slant inward. The roof and one of the terraces are cantilevered. The Entrance is hidden. There are broad overhangs. The seating, lighting, desks, cabinets and shelves are built-in. The kitchen has a perforated decorative shutter that opens toward the entry over a built-in planter. There are walls of glass and mitered glass corner windows. Clerestory windows provide natural lighting to the bathrooms. The master bedroom has a fireplace and French doors that lead to a secluded terrace (cantilevered balcony).
 
1: Viewed from the street, the home is totally secluded and private, much like it was nearly fifty years ago.
 
1b: The Lamp and Pedestal, Garage and extended retaining wall viewed from the West. These were added by Donald Stromquist when he moved back into the home the second time.
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Additional Garage views.
 

2: Viewed from the West, as you drive up the drive, the Living Room comes into view. .
 
3: As you approach the home from the street below, the roof cantilevers skyward nearly sixteen feet past the living room, out over the terrace.
 

4: Viewed from the Northwest. From the peak over the living room and terrace, the roof slants down toward the back of the home. The slant of the windows match the slope of the roof, The triangle pier to the right of the glass wall mirrors the triangle to the right of the Entryway.
 
4b: The doors are a work of art. They are set within a wall of glass. The top has the same slope as the roof. At first glance, the bottom gives the appearance to be at a slant also, but in reality is straight. These French doors lead out to this walled living room terrace.
 
4c: The top of these French doors have the same slope as the roof. At first glance, the bottom gives the appearance to be at a slant also, but in reality is straight.
 

4d: Viewed from the Northwest, the roof cantilevers skyward nearly sixteen feet past the living room, out over the terrace. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints, leaving the vertical joints flush with the face of the brick. The windows include mitered the glass corners.
 
4e: Detail of the cantilevered roof that reaches past the living room, out over the terrace.
 
4f: Detail of the Living Room Terrace viewed from the East. All rows of concrete block below the window line are slightly inset so that the wall slant inward.
 
5: Viewed from the North, the Living Room is on the left. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints, leaving the vertical joints flush with the face of the brick. All rows of concrete block below the window line are slightly inset so that the wall slant inward.
5b: Detail showing the rows of concrete block slightly inset, slanting the wall inward.
6: Viewed from the Northeast, the Living Room is on the left. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints, adding to the horizontal impression. .
6b: Detail showing the rows of concrete block below the window line slightly inset, slanting the wall inward.

7: The Drive viewed from the Northwest. The Shed is on the left in the background. The hidden Entrance is in the center under the roof covering the Carport. The Living Room is n the right.
 
7b: The retaining wall and Shed were constructed at the same time as the home. The rows of concrete block in the retaining wall are slightly inset, slanting the wall away from the home. The Shed is in the center background. The hidden Entrance is on the right. It is as if Wright could envision these angles fitting together like a puzzle.
 
8: The Entry viewed from the North. The home is designed on a diamond grid consisting of 60 and 120 degree angles. The triangle pier to the right of the glass wall mirrors the triangle to the right of the Living Room terrace doors.
 
9: The Entry viewed from the Northeast. The door is a work of art. It is set within a wall of glass. The top has the same slope as the roof. The angle of the wall leading out from the glass is symmetrical.
9: Detail of the Entryway woodwork.
10: The Shed viewed from the Northwest. Wright set the Shed behind the retaining wall, inset into the hillside. Celestory windows allow natural light within the shed. The "slant" of the retaining wall becomes more apparent as it intersects the doorway.
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Additional Shed views.
11: The retaining wall stair steps down to the base of the window line.
11b: Detail of roof overhang.
12: The Carport viewed from the Southeast. The addition of the garage can be seen in the background.

13: The Study viewed from the Northeast. The entry is to the right (out of view).
 
14: Viewed from the East, the Bedroom is on the left, the Study is on the right. From the peak over the living room and terrace, the roof slants down toward the bedroom on the left, the lowest point for the roof. Celestory windows allow natural light to the two bathrooms.
 
15: Viewed from the East, the two Bedrooms are on the left, the Study is on the right. Celestory windows allow natural light to the two bathrooms.
 
15b: Detail of the Celestory windows that allow natural light into the two bathrooms and includes three mitered glass corners.
 
15c: Detail of the decorative fascia that surrounds the home.
 
15d: Detail of the Study windows. Hinged at the top, windows open to allow fresh air.
 
16: Bedroom and Study viewed from the Southeast, the Bedroom is on the left, the Study is on the right. From the peak over the living room and terrace, the roof slants down toward the 120 degree mitered glass corner in the foreground, the lowest point for the roof.
 
17: Bedrooms viewed from the East. The center Bedroom is on the left and includes mitered glass corners. The retaining wall lines up with the base of the window line.
 
17b: The secluded balcony on the left cantilevers sixteen feet from the Master Bedroom. The middle Bedroom is on the right and includes mitered glass corners.
 
18: Viewed from the Southeast, the cantilevered Terrace Balcony floats above the hillside.
 
18b: Detail of Master Bedroom Terrace Balcony. Each row is slightly inset so that the wall slant inward.
 
19: Viewed from the Southeast. The rows of concrete block in the retaining wall are slightly inset, slanting the wall toward the home. The rows in the balcony and retaining wall line up. The Master Bedroom is on he far left, the middle Bedroom on the right.
20: Master Bedroom TerraceBalcony viewed from the Southeast. The cantilevered balcony floats above the hillside...

21: Viewed from the Southwest.  The Living Room is on the left. The Master Bedroom and Terrace Balcony are in the center and the middle Bedroom is on the right. Mitered glass corners are on the left and right of the Terrace.
 
21b: Detail of Master Bedroom Terrace. Each row is slightly inset so that the wall slant inward. The rows in the balcony and retaining wall line up.
 
22: Master Bedroom Viewed from below the Terrace Balcony. Corners are mitered glass.
 
23: Living Room viewed from the South, below the Terrace Balcony.
 
24: Viewed from the Living Room Terrace, the Living Room is on the left, the Master Bedroom and Terrace Balcony is on he right. Both rooms designed with mitered glass corners.

24b: View of the Master Bedroom and Terrace Balcony from the Northwest.
 
25: Detail of the Western corner of the Living Room.
 
26: Detail of the Living Room mitered glass corner.
 
27: Southwest wall of he Living Room. All rows of concrete block below the window line are slightly inset so that the wall slant inward.
 
28: Detail of the western corner of the Living Room Terrace.
 
29: Living Room and Terrace viewed from the West.
 
Photographs and text by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2009
 
 
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