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Donald M. and Jane Stromquist Residence (1958) (S.429)
 
Interior Photographs By Brady Donley on May 2004
The Stromquist home is the only structure designed by Wright in the state of Utah. As you approach the home from the street below, the roof cantilevers skyward over the living room and terrace. The living room has two large walls of windows, one floor to ceiling. From the peak over the living room, the roof slants down toward the back of the home. Wright designed these windows to match the slope of the roof. The slope of the windows is not immediately evident, but becomes apparent as your eye follows the slope at the floor. Wright used this window design in only one other home. The Archie Teater Studio. The doors are a work of art. They are set within a wall of glass. The top has the same slope as the roof. At first glance, the bottom gives the appearance to be at a slant also, but in reality is straight. The 2,700 square foot home has three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a work space (kitchen), living room, dining area, study, two fireplaces, one large centrally located in the living room, and two   terraces. It is designed on a diamond grid consisting of 60 and 120 degree angles. The basic materials are glass, concrete block and mahogany. There are many classic Wright details. Originally designed in stone, the Stromquists felt it would be to costly. Wright replaced stone with concrete block and raked only the horizontal joints, leaving the vertical joints flush with the face of the brick. The seating, lighting, desks, cabinets and shelves are built-in. The kitchen has a perforated decorative shutter that opens toward the entry. There are mitered glass corner windows. Clerestory windows provide natural lighting to the bathrooms. The master bedroom has a fireplace and French doors that lead to a secluded terrace (balcony). The original dining room table and some of the original hassocks, built by Donald over forty years earlier, were "pressed into service" again. The master bedroom fireplace that never functioned, was repaired. 
 
1: View from the entry hall looking West at the Living Room. The Dining area is to the far left. The ceiling slopes upward toward the diamond shaped pier and cantilevers outward, giving the appearance that it floats effortlessly past the windowed walls.
 

1b: Wright designed these windows to match the slope of the roof. The slope of the windows is not immediately evident, but becomes apparent as your eye follows the slope just above the built-in seating. There are mitered glass corner windows.
 
1c: The Wright designed "Origami Chair" fits naturally in the Living Room. Some of the original hassocks, built by Donald over forty years earlier, were "pressed into service" again. The home was designed on a diamond grid consisting of 60 and 120 degree angles which were also inscribed in the floor.
 

2: Living Room viewed from the North. Wright designed these windows to match the slope of the roof. The slope of the windows become apparent as your eye moves down just above the built-in seating. The windows on the right have mitered glass corners.
 

2b: The original Wright designed dining room table built by Donald over forty years earlier, was "pressed into service" again in 2000 when he had the opportunity to purchase and move back into his home. The table and chairs are designed to utilize the same angles used throughout the home.
 

2c: The Wright designed "Origami Chair" fits naturally in the Living Room.
 

3: Living Room viewed from the Southwest. The furniture was designed by Wright. Seating, ceiling lights, cabinets and shelves are built-in. The centrally located fireplace is on the right.
 
3b: The Wright designed "Origami Chair" fits naturally in the Living Room. The hassocks and coffee table were also designed by Wright.
 

3c: Wright designed the cabinets, seating, and shelves are built-in as well as the "Origami Chairs", hassock and coffee table.
 

3d: The centrally located fireplace is on the right and steps back and down. The home was designed on a diamond grid consisting of 60 and 120 degree angles which were also inscribed in the floor.
 

4: Living Room viewed from the South. The original Wright designed dining room table built by Donald over forty years earlier, was "pressed into service" again in 2000. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints, leaving the vertical joints flush with the face of the brick.
 
4a: The doors are a work of art. They are set within a wall of glass. The top has the same slope as the roof.
 
4b: The original Wright designed dining room table built by Donald over forty years earlier, was "pressed into service" again in 2000. Reproduction of Wright designed copper weed holder is sitting on the table.

5: Study viewed from the West. The ceiling lights, shelves, cabinets, desk and seating are built-in. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints, leaving the vertical joints flush with the face of the brick. All rows of concrete block below the window line are slightly inset so that the wall appears to slant inward. The home was designed on a diamond grid consisting of 60 and 120 degree angles which were also inscribed in the floor.
 
5b: The shelves are built-in.
 
5c: The cabinets, desk and shelves are built-in. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints, leaving the vertical joints flush with the face of the brick. The home was designed on a diamond grid consisting of 60 and 120 degree angles which were also inscribed in the floor.
 
5d: The seating was built-in.
 
6: Bedroom viewed from the North. The desk, cabinets, ceiling lights, and shelves are built-in. The walls were paneled in mahogany. From the peak over the living room, the roof slants down toward the lowest point seen on the left. Wright designed the windows to match the slope of the roof and include mitered the glass corners. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints. The diamond grid consisting of 60 and 120 degree angles were inscribed in the concrete floor.
 
6b: From the peak over the living room, the roof slants down toward the lowest point seen on the top left. The corners were mitered glass.
 
6c: The desk and cabinets are built-in. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints. All rows of concrete block below the window line are slightly inset so that the wall appears to slant inward. This is evident where the right side of the cabinet meets the wall.
 
6d: This shelf is a built-in. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints. All rows of concrete block below the window line are slightly inset so that the wall appears to slant inward. The diamond grid consisting of 60 and 120 degree angles were inscribed in the concrete floor...............

7: Center Bedroom viewed from the North. The cabinets, desk and shelves are built-in. The walls were paneled in mahogany. From the peak over the living room, the roof slants down toward this end of the house. Wright designed the windows to match the slope of the roof and include mitered glass corners. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints. All rows of concrete block below the window line are slightly inset so that the wall appears to slant inward.
 
7b: The cabinets and desk are built-in. The walls were paneled in mahogany.
 
7c: From the peak over the living room, the roof slants down toward this end of the house. Wright designed the windows to match the slope of the roof and include mitered glass corners.
 
7d: The cabinets and desk are built-in. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints. All rows of concrete block below the window line are slightly inset so that the wall appears to slant inward. Some of the original hassocks, built by Donald over forty years earlier, were "pressed into service" again.
 
7e: This shelf is a built-in. The walls were paneled in mahogany. From the peak over the living room, the roof slants down toward this end of the house. Wright designed the windows to match the slope of the roof with mitered glass corners. The concrete block walls were raked only on the horizontal joints. All rows of concrete block below the window line are slightly inset so that the wall appears to slant inward.
 
8: Master Bedroom viewed from the East. The cabinets and shelves are built-in. Wright designed the windows to match the slope of the roof and include mitered glass corners. The doors are a work of art. They are set within a wall of glass. The top has the same slope as the roof. They lead out to a private terrace/balcony. The fireplace is on the right.
 
8b: The cabinets are built-in and made of mahogany.
 
8c: Wright designed the windows to match the slope of the roof and include mitered glass corners. The doors are a work of art. They are set within a wall of glass. The top has the same slope as the roof. They lead out to a private terrace/balcony.
 
8d: Detail of the mitered glass corners.
 
9: Master Bedroom viewed from the East. Wright designed the windows to match the slope of the roof and include mitered glass corners. The doors lead out to a private terrace/balcony. The fireplace is on the right. The shelves are built-in.
 
9b: Some of the original hassocks, built by Donald over forty years earlier, were "pressed into service" again. The fireplace is on the right. The shelves are built-in.
 
9c: The shelves are built-in.

10: The Workspace/Kitchen was upgraded with granite counter tops and new appliances. The skylight allows natural light into the area. The buffalo design shutters open to the entryway.
 
10b: The skylight allows natural light into the area. The buffalo design shutters open to the entryway.
 
10c: The buffalo design shutters open to the entryway.
 
Photographs by Brady Donley, Copyright 2004. Text by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2009
 
 
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