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Wright Studies

Loren B. Pope Residence, Falls Church, Virginia (1939 - S.268)

 
  Floor Plan    Photographs (2006)    Photographs (2015) 
 
Floor Plan
 
 
 
 
Loren B. Pope Residence By Douglas M. Steiner (April 2006)
 
In April, 2006 on a trip to Washington D. C. with our oldest grandson, we had the opportunity to visit the Pope-Leighey House. The house has rotated about 45 degrees during the 1965 reconstruction, so where the entrance faced Southwest in 1939, it now faces Northwest. But I assume that had to do with typography rather than lighting. Like many of Wright's Usonian homes, it was an "L" shaped design based on a 2x4 foot rectangular module. It was constructed of brick, unfinished cypress and glass.
       Ten years before our visit, the home was moved again. Structural problems began to create cracks due to the unstable soil under the home. In 1996, the home was moved 30 feet away, where it sits today.
       As you approach the home from the same direction as in 1939, the Carport, it has been positioned on a slope much like the original. Like many of Wright's designs, the entrance is hidden, and is not revealed until you reach the home. So you take a step of faith, not knowing where, but knowing it is there.
       Very little has sprouted during the beginning of April, so the unfinished cypress blends with the bare trees. The lack of
  windows on the approach reveals little of the interior of the home. Perforated Light Screens allow soft light into the home, adding a measure of privacy and a decorative design element to the home.
       The roof of the Carport cantilevers out 8' 6" at the front, is 19' wide, and cantilevers out from the house 15' 6" in the back. The roof was designed with three layers of 2x4's, each superimposed on top of the other.
       The Perforated Light Screens that run along the top of the Gallery are 4' wide by approximately 11 - 11.5". The home was built on a Cherokee red concrete slab, bordered in red brick. Embedded in the concrete was the heating system, As Wright wrote in The Natural House, "...if your feet are warm, and you sit warm, you are warm." p.159.
       All doors and windows open outward and are hung by piano hinges. Corners vanish when two corner windows are opened. The horizontal Perforated Light Screens are hung from the top.
       The following is a set of eight photographs of the Pope-Leighey House, by Douglas M. Steiner, April 7, 2006. Text and photographs by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2015.
 
1) Pope-Leighey House 2006, viewed from the Southwest, from the approach to the home. The two Bedrooms are on the left, the Carport and Entrance in the center, Sanctum (office), kitchen and Living Room are on the right. It was constructed of brick, unfinished cypress and glass. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2006.44.0815-1)
 
1A) Detail of the approach to the home. The two Bedrooms are on the left, the Carport and Entrance in the center, Sanctum (office), kitchen and Living Room are on the right.
 
2) Pope-Leighey House 2006, viewed from the Southwest. Detail of the construction of the cantilevered Carport. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2006.44.0815-2)
 
3) Pope-Leighey House 2006, viewed from the North. Detail of the Northern corner of the Gallery, and the Perforated Light Screen. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2006.44.0815-3)
 
4) Pope-Leighey House 2006, viewed from the North. The two bedrooms are in the foreground wing. The row of Perforated Light Screen windows that run the length of the Gallery, allow light in and also a measure of privacy. The Entrance, Carport and Office are to the right. The row of Perforated Light Screen Clerestory windows of the Living and Dining Rooms can be seen in the background. Like other Usonias, the homes are built on a slap, have a flat roofs and built-in planters. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2006.44.0815-4)
 
5) Pope-Leighey House 2006, viewed from the Northeast. Detail of the decorative overhang and the North end of the children's room. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2006.44.0815-5)
 
5A) Detail of the Perforated Light Screen shutters..
 
6) Pope-Leighey House 2006, viewed from the Northeast. Detail of the children's room windows. Four windows on the Southeast side open outward. The two windows forming the corner also open outward, eliminating the corner. Doors and windows are attached with piano hinges. All exterior wood is left unfinished. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2006.44.0815-6)
 
6A) Detail of the children's room windows. The two windows forming the corner also open outward, eliminating the corner. Doors and windows are attached with piano hinges.
 
7) Pope-Leighey House 2006, viewed from the East. The Living Room is on the left, Dining Room in the center, Bath and Master Bedroom to the right. Floor to ceiling doors open outward from the Dining Room. Two doors forming the Northern corner of the Dining Room, open outward, eliminating the corner. Doors and windows are attached with piano hinges. All exterior wood is left unfinished. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2006.44.0815-7)
 
 
7A) Floor to ceiling doors open outward from the Dining Room. Two doors forming the Northern corner of the Dining Room, open outward, eliminating the corner.
 
7B) Two doors forming the Northern corner of the Dining Room, open outward, eliminating the corner. Doors and windows are attached with piano hinges.
 
8) Pope-Leighey House 2006, viewed from the Southeast. The trellised roof overhang adds a decorative element to the design of the home, and allows additional soft light to the Perforated Light Screens, into the Living Room. The Living Room's screened Terrace is on the left, the Bedroom wing is on the far right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2006.44.0815-8)
 
8A) Detail of the trellised roof overhang which adds a decorative element to the design of the home, and allows additional soft light to the Perforated Light Screens, into the Living Room.
 
Text and photographs by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2015.
 
 
 
Loren B. Pope Residence By Douglas M. Steiner (April 2015)
 
On April 7, 2015 nine years to the day, we had the opportunity to visit the Pope-Leighey Residence for the second time, on a trip to Washington D. C. with our granddaughter.
       The house has rotated about 45 degrees during the 1965 reconstruction, so where the entrance faced Southwest in 1939, it now faces Northwest. Like many of Wright's Usonian homes, it was an "L" shaped design based on a 2x4 foot rectangular module. It was constructed of brick, cypress and glass.
       Nineteen years before this visit, the home was moved again. Structural problems began to create cracks due to the unstable soil under the home. In 1996, the home was moved 30 feet away, where it sits today. Third time is a charm.
       The home is situated on the Woodlawn Plantation in Mount Vernon, but so seclude in the woods that the four-lane road, only 300 feet away, is hidden from view. The colors of the unfinished cypress and bricks blends with the surroundings. Like other Usonians, the homes are built on a slap, have a flat roofs and built-in planters. The slab which the home is built on is bordered in bricks.
       The home slowly rises above the ground as the ground slopes away from the home. Like many of Wright's designs, the entrance is hidden, and is not revealed until you reach the home. Four door panels make up the Entrance. The two outside panels are fixed, the two center doors are mounted with piano hinges and open outward. Doors  and open outward. The cantilevered Carport shelters and hides the entrance. The roof of the Carport cantilevers out 8' 6" at the front, is 19' wide, and cantilevers out from the house 15' 6" in the back. The roof was designed with three layers of 2x4's, each superimposed on top of the other.
       Horizontal cypress siding measures 11 5/8" wide. The batten measures 2 1/4", with a 3/8" lip that sets into the upper groove, leaving 1 7/8" exposed. Fascia measures 7 5/8". The siding is affixed with screws and is left natural. "Mr. Wright's idea was that wood was its own best preservative..." The Pope-Leighey House, Morton, 1983, p.71. All screw slots are set horizontally. "They were specified to be horizontal; everything possible was horizontal. Mr. Wright felt that the horizontal line conveyed a sense of unity with the earth." Gordon Chadwick, apprentice
  assigned to the construction of the Pope house, p.70.
       The house cost $7,000 to build. The red brick was chosen because it was the cheapest available. Horizontal joints were raked, vertical joints matched the color of the brick, and were flush with the surface, p.67.
       There are three cantilevered, trellised roofs, the Children's Room, the Living and Dining Rooms. The Living Room trellis was missing in 1964, but rebuilt in the 1965 relocation and renovation. They add a decorative element to the design of the home. There is a fourth trellis in the Living Room, above the stairs to the Entry.
       The home encompasses 1,200 square feet. To cool the home in the summer, doors on either side of the Living and Dining Rooms were left open, creating a cross ventilation, a natural air conditioning.
       The height of the ceiling in the Living Room is 12 feet. Tidewater Red cypress was grown and milled in Florida, then shipped to the lumber yard in Baltimore by boat, p.66-67. The interior wood was finished with Minwax, the furniture finished with paste wax, P.71.The fireplace, hearth, stairs and some of the walls were constructed of red brick. A trellis over the stairs repeat the 2 x 4' pattern. Perforated Light Screens defuse and soften the interior light. The flow of the ceiling cypress in the Entryway, is barely broken as it continues out over the Carport. Five stairs lead from the Entry to the Kitchen (behind the fireplace), Dining and Living Rooms. Built-in storage cabinets are just to the right of the stairs. The ceiling drops to a height of 7 feet in the Dining Room. Shelves are cantilevered out from the brick wall secured by steel... Three smaller Wright designed, square, freestanding tables are combined to create the Dining Room Table. The Dining Room chairs were designed by Wright, and used in many of the Usonian homes. The beige and rose fabric pattern "Imperial Triangle," was also specified in the Wright designed Nakoma Clubhouse. End table mimic the design of the larger dining tables. Chairs are placed in the living room.
       The following is a set of 63 photographs of the Pope-Leighey House, by Douglas M. Steiner, April 7, 2015. Text and photographs by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2015.
 
1) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed on the approach from the Southwest. The home is situated on the Woodlawn Plantation in Mount Vernon, but so seclude in the woods that the four-lane road, only 300 feet away, is hidden from view. It was constructed of brick, unfinished cypress and glass. The two Bedrooms are on the left, the Carport and Entrance in the center, Sanctum (office), Kitchen and Living Room are on the right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-1)
 
2) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. The colors of the unfinished cypress and bricks blends with the surroundings. The two Bedrooms are on the left, the Carport and Entrance in the center, Office, Kitchen and Living Room are on the right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-2)
 
3) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. Two Bedrooms are on the left, the Carport and Entrance in the center, Office, Kitchen and Living Room are on the right. The screened terrace off the Living Room is on the far right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-3)
 
4) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. The roof of the Carport cantilevers out 8' 6" at the front, is 19' wide, and cantilevers out from the house 15' 6" in the back. Two Bedrooms are on the left, the Carport and Entrance in the center, the Office is on the right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-4)
 
5) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. The roof was designed with three layers of 2x4's, each superimposed on top of the other. Two Bedrooms are on the left, the Carport and Entrance in the center, the Office is on the right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-5)
 
6) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the West. In 1996, the home was moved 30 feet away, where it sits today. Structural problems began to create cracks due to the unstable soil under the home. Two Bedrooms are on the left, the Carport and Entrance in the foreground, the Office is on the right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-6)
 
7) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the West. Like many of Wright's designs, the entrance is hidden, and is not revealed until you reach the home. Two Bedrooms are on the left, the Carport and Entrance in the foreground, the Office is on the right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-7)
 
8) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the West. Four door panels make up the Entrance. The two outside panels are fixed, the two center doors open outward. The roof was designed with three layers of 2x4's, each superimposed on top of the other. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-8)
 
8A) Detail of the roof, designed with three layers of 2x4's, each superimposed on top of the other.
 
9) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Northwest. Four door panels make up the Entrance. The two outside panels are fixed, the two center doors open outward. The column on the left and a portion of the entry way door is of brick. Perforated Light Screens that run the length of the Gallery on the left, continues to the right of the entryway. A Wright designed end table sits to the right of the Entry. The Office is to the right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-9)
 
10) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Northwest. Detail of the Entry. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-10)
 
11) Pope-Leighey House 2015. Detail of the entry way door construction. Doors are mounted with piano hinges and open outward. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-11)
 
12) Pope-Leighey House 2015. Detail of the entry way door construction. Doors are mounted with piano hinges and open outward. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-12)
 
13) Pope-Leighey House 2015. Wright designed end table sits to the right of the Entry. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-13)
 
14) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. View of the Gallery on the left from under the cantilevered carport. The row of Perforated Light Screens that run the length of the Gallery, allows light in and gives a measure of privacy. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-14)
 
15) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. The Gallery runs from the Entry to the Children's Room doorway. Perforated Light Screens allow light in and offer a measure of privacy. Horizontal cypress siding measures 11 5/8" wide. The batten measures 2 1/4", with a 3/8" lip that sets into the upper grove, leaving 1 7/8" exposed. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-15)
 
16) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. Detail of the Gallery that runs from the Entry to the Children's Room doorway. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-16)
 
17) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. Detail of the Perforated Light Screens. Screens are mounted along the top with piano hinges and open outward. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-17)
 
18) Pope-Leighey House 2015. Detail of the cypress siding. Siding is affixed with screws. All screw slots are set horizontally. "They were specified to be horizontal; everything possible was horizontal. Mr. Wright felt that the horizontal line conveyed a sense of unity with the earth." Gordon Chadwick, apprentice assigned to the construction of the Pope house. The Pope-Leighey House, Morton, 1983, p.70. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-18)
 
19) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the North. The two bedrooms are in the foreground wing. The row of Perforated Light Screen windows that run the length of the Gallery, allow light in and a measure of privacy. The Entrance, Carport and Office are to the right. The row of Perforated Light Screen Clerestory windows of the Living and Dining Rooms can be seen in the background. Like other Usonians, the homes are built on a slap, have a flat roofs and built-in planters. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-19)
 
20) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the North. Detail of the Northern corner of the Gallery, and the Perforated Light Screen. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-20)
 
21) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the North. Detail of the Northern corner of the Gallery. The slab which the home is built on is bordered in bricks. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-21)
 
22) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the North. The Children's Room is on the left, the Gallery is in the center. The cantilevered Carport on the right shelters and hides the entrance. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-22)
 
23) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the North. The home slowly rises above the ground as the ground slopes away from the home. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-23)
 
24) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the North. The trellised roof cantilevers past the end of the Children's Room. Perforated Light Screens are turned 90 degrees and attached like window shutters. A built-in planter is on the Eastern corner and blends home with the earth. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-24)
 
25) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the North. Details of the bricks that border the slab that the home is built on. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-25)
 
26) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the North. Horizontal cypress siding measures 11 5/8" wide. The base shoe measures 3 1/2 inches plus a 5/16" lip. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-26)
 
27) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the North. The Living Room is on the far left, the Children's Bedroom is in the foreground, the Carport is on the right. Perforated Light Screens are turned 90 degrees and attached like window shutters. A built-in planter is on the Eastern corner of the Children's Bedroom. The trellised roof cantilevers out past the end of the house. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-27)
 
28) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the North. All cypress siding is left natural. Fascia measures 7 5/8". Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-28)
 
29) Pope-Leighey House 2015. Detail of the Children's Room Perforated Light Screens. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-29)
 
30) Pope-Leighey House 2015. Detail of the Children's Room trellised roof which cantilevers past the end of the house. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-30)
 
31) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Northeast. The five windows on the left are hung with piano hinges and open outward. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-31)
 
32) Pope-Leighey House 2015. Detail of the built-in planter. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-32)
 
33) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Northeast. Detail of the children's room windows. Four windows on the Southeast side open outward. The two windows forming the corner also open outward, eliminating the corner. Doors and windows are attached with piano hinges. All exterior wood is left unfinished. The same idea is followed on the left. The two doors forming the corner of the Dining Room open outward, eliminating the corner. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-3)
 
34) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Northeast. The Master Bedroom windows are on the left, the Children's Room windows are to the right. All windows are hung by piano hinges and open outward. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-34)
 
34A) Detail of the Children's Room windows. The two windows forming the corner open outward, eliminating the corner.
 
35) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Northeast. Detail of the Children's Room corner. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-35)
 
36) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Northeast. The Living and Dining Room wing is on the left, the Bedroom wing is to the right. Ceilings are 12' high in the living room and drop to 7 feet in the Dining Room. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-36)
 
37) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Northeast. The Living and Dining Room wing is on the left, the Bedroom wing is to the right. From the Entry, five steps lead down to the Living, Dining and Kitchen areas. The home encompasses 1,200 square feet. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-37)
 
38) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Northeast. Two trellised roofs cantilever past the end of the Living and Dining Rooms. The Living Room trellis was removed by the 1964, rebuilt in the 1965 relocation and renovation. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-38)
 
39) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the East. Clerestory Perforated Light Screens add soft light to the interior of the Living Room. Dining Room doors open outward to the Terrace. The Master Bedroom is on the right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-39)
 
40) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the East. Clerestory Perforated Light Screens add soft light to the interior of the Living Room. Dining Room doors open outward to the Terrace. Trellised roofs add a decorative element to the design of the home. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-40)
 
41) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the East. The corner sets and two sets of doors on the right open outward to the Terrace. All doors are hung by piano hinges. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-41)
 
41A) Detail of the Dining Room Trellised Roof.
 
41B) The two doors forming the corner open outward, eliminating the corner.
 
42) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the East. The Dining Room is on the left, the vertical window is the Bath, the Master Bedroom is on the right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-42)
 
43) Pope-Leighey House 2015, the Southeastern end of the Living Room viewed from the East. Cypress siding is left unfinished. "Mr. Wright's idea that wood was its own best preservative..." The Pope-Leighey House, Morton, 1983, p.71. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-43)
 
43A) The Living Room trellis was destroyed by Hurricane Hazel in 1954. It was restored to original specifications during the reconstruction in 1965.
 
44) Pope-Leighey House 2015, the Southeastern end of the Living Room viewed from the East. Horizontal cypress siding measures 11 5/8" wide. The batten measures 2 1/4", with a 3/8" lip that sets into the upper groove, leaving 1 7/8" exposed. Nine short Perforated Light Screens cover the short wall of the Living Room. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-44)
 
45) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the East. To cool the home in the summer, doors on either side of the Living and Dining Rooms were left open, creating a cross ventilation, a natural air conditioning. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-45)
 
46) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the East. The design was based on a 2x4 foot rectangular module. Wall measurements, trellis shapes, door widths, roof overhangs, all conform to the grid. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-46)
 
47) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the East. Roof Trellis are based on 2 x 4 dimensions. Upper Perforated Light Screens are 4 feet wide. The vertical row of Light Screens are two feet wide. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-47)
 
48) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the East. This roof trellis was missing in 1964 images. It was resorted to this condition in the 1965 relocation and renovation. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-4)
 
49) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the East. Detail of the Eastern corner of the Living Room. All screw slots are set horizontally. "They were specified to be horizontal; everything possible was horizontal. Mr. Wright felt that the horizontal line conveyed a sense of unity with the earth." Gordon Chadwick, apprentice assigned to the construction of the Pope house. The Pope-Leighey House, Morton, 1983, p.70. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-49)
 
50) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southeast. The trellised roof overhang adds a decorative element to the design of the home, and allows additional soft light to the Perforated Light Screens, into the Living Room. The Living Room's screened Terrace is on the left, the Bedroom wing is on the far right. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-50)
 
51) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southeast. Doors open outward from the Living Room to the Terrace. The screened Terrace is constructed of wood, copper tubing and copper screen. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-51)
 
52) Pope-Leighey House 2015. Detail of the Southern corner of the Living Room. Wright takes a simple element like wood and creates a complex design. Tidewater Red cypress was grown and milled in Florida, then shipped to the lumber yard in Baltimore by boat. The Pope-Leighey House, Morton, 1983, p.66-67. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-5)
 
53) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the South. The Office is on the far left, Workspace (Kitchen) is two it's right, the Living Room to the right. The house cost $7,000 to build. The red brick was chosen because it was the cheapest available. Horizontal joints were raked, vertical joints matched the color of the brick, and were flush with the surface. The Pope-Leighey House, Morton, 1983, p.67. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-53)
 
54) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the South. With the use of thin copper tubing, Wright was able to remove the wood structure from both corners. The two screen doors on the right are hung with piano hinges and open outward. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-5)
 
55) Pope-Leighey House 2015. Detail of the screened patio construction. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-55)
 
56) Pope-Leighey House 2015 viewed from the Southwest. The two Bedrooms are on the left, the Carport and Entrance in the center, Office, Kitchen and Living Room are on the right. There is a built-in planter just outside the kitchen window. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-5)
 
56A) Detail of the built-in planter just outside the kitchen window.
 
57) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. The home was built on a gentle slope. The Office on the left is at the same level as the Entrance and Bedrooms. From the Entry, five steps down leads to the Kitchen, Living and Dining Room level. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-57)
 
58) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. Three sets of doors lead out to the screened patio. The walls of the Kitchen on the left are constructed of brick, as is one wall of the Living Room on the right. The design of the footprint is based on a 2x4 foot rectangular module which can be seen scored into the patio concrete. The concrete floor is tinted Cherokee red. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-58)
 
58A) The design of the footprint is based on a 2x4 foot rectangular module which can be seen scored into the patio concrete. The concrete floor is tinted Cherokee red.
 
59) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. The tall Kitchen window is hung by a piano hinge and opens outward. The top of the build-in planter matches the height of the Kitchen counter. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-59)
 
60) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. All four windows in the Office are hung by piano hinges, but only the two center windows open as a pair. The left window is hinged on the right, the right window is hinged on the left. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-6)
 
61) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the Southwest. After fully viewing the exterior of the house, we return back to the original entry way to the home. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-61)
 
62) Pope-Leighey House 2015, viewed from the West. The colors of the unfinished cypress and bricks blends with the surroundings. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-62)
 
63) Pope-Leighey House 2015. View of the Living and Dining room from the Southeast. The height of the ceiling in the Living Room is 12 feet. Tidewater Red cypress was grown and milled in Florida, then shipped to the lumber yard in Baltimore by boat. The Pope-Leighey House, Morton, 1983, p.66-67. The interior wood was finished with Minwax, the furniture finished with paste wax, P.71.The fireplace, hearth, stairs and some of the walls were constructed of red brick. A trellis over the stairs repeat the 2 x 4' pattern. Perforated Light Screens defuse and soften the interior light. The flow of the ceiling cypress in the Entryway, is barely broken as it continues out over the Carport. Five stairs lead from the Entry to the Kitchen (behind the fireplace), Dining and Living Rooms. Built-in storage cabinets are just to the right of the stairs. The ceiling drops to a height of 7 feet in the Dining Room. Shelves are cantilevered out from the brick wall secured by steel... Three smaller Wright designed, square, freestanding tables are combined to create the Dining Room Table. The Dining Room chairs were designed by Wright, and used in many of the Usonian homes. The beige and rose fabric pattern "Imperial Triangle," was also specified in the Wright designed Nakoma Clubhouse. End table mimic the design of the larger dining tables. Chairs are placed in the living room instead of built-in seating. Photographed by and courtesy of Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2015.03.0815-63)
 
63A) The fireplace, hearth, stairs and some of the walls were constructed of red brick.
 
63B) A trellis over the stairs repeat the 2 x 4' pattern. Perforated Light Screens defuse and soften the interior light. The flow of the ceiling cypress in the Entryway, is barely broken as it continues out over the Carport. Five stairs lead from the Entry to the Kitchen (behind the fireplace), Dining and Living Rooms.
 
63C) The ceiling drops to a height of 7 feet in the Dining Room. Shelves are cantilevered out from the brick wall secured by steel... Three smaller Wright designed, square, freestanding tables are combined to create the Dining Room Table. The Dining Room chairs were designed by Wright, and used in many of the Usonian homes. The beige and rose fabric pattern "Imperial Triangle," was also specified in the Wright designed Nakoma Clubhouse. See additional Wright Chairs...
 
63D) Three smaller Wright designed, square, freestanding tables are combined to create the Dining Room Table. The Dining Room chairs were designed by Wright, and used in many of the Usonian homes. The beige and rose fabric pattern "Imperial Triangle," was also specified in the Wright designed Nakoma Clubhouse.
 
63E) Detail of the Wright designed table.
 
63F) End tables mimic the design of the larger dining tables. Chairs are placed in the living room instead of built-in seating.
 
 
Text and photographs by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2015.
 
 

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