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IOWA
 
There are a total of 11 homes and buildings located in Iowa.
  ALSOP    CITY NATIONAL BANK    GRANT    LAMBERSON    MEIER    MILLER    PARK INN    SUNDAY    STOCKMAN    TRIER    WALTER 
 
 
  MINNESOTA    MISSOURI    NEBRASKA    OTHER HOMES 
 
   
Date: 2015

Title: Des Moines Architecture & Design (Soft Cover) (Published by The History Press, Charleston, SC)

Author: Pridmore, Jay

Description: Back cover: "Chart the evolution of an architectural jewel in the American heartland. Des Moines boasts a remarkable architectural portfolio rich in depth and quality. The town drew wide attention in the nineteenth century with structures like the Iowa State Capitol and the Terrace Hill mansion. Des Moines embraced the City Beautiful movement in the twentieth century and became home to well-known work by Eliel and Eero Saarinen, notably the city's innovative Art Center. A contemporary architectural renaissance produced lauded landmarks like the Meredith Headquarters, the Des Moines Public Library and the John and Mary Pappajohn Sculpture Park. Author Jay Pridmore crafts an illustrated survey of the architecture and design of Iowa's largest city." Note: We provided one photograph of the Trier House in Johnson, Iowa, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1956. Original list price $24.99. (First Edition)

Size: 7.5 x 9.25

Pages: Pp 174

ST#:
2015.37.0521
   
Date: 2016

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright and Mason City, Architectural Heart of The Prairie (Soft Cover) (Published by The History Press, Charleston, SC)

Author: Behrens, Roy R.

Description: In the early 1900s, Frank Lloyd Wright transformed a small Midwestern prairie community into one of the world's most important architectural destinations. Mason City, Iowa, became home to his City National Bank and Park Inn--the last surviving Wright hotel. In addition, his prototype Stockman House helped launch the Prairie School architectural style. Soon after, architect Walter Burley Griffin followed in Wright's footsteps, designing a cluster of Prairie School homes in the Rock Crest/Rock Glen neighborhood. Design historian Roy Behrens leads the way through Mason City's historic development from the Industrial Revolution to the modern era of Frank Lloyd Wright. (Back Cover.) Original list price $21.99.
(First Edition)

Size: 6 x 9 

Pages: Pp 143

ST#:
2016.27.0418
   
   
   
ALVIN MILLER RESIDENCE (1946 - S.289)
   
Date: 1952

Title: Alvin Miller Residence, Charles City, Iowa, Circa 1952 (1946 - S.289).

Description: View of the front of the house, the Southeast elevation. The carport is on the left. The Gallery and bedrooms are in the center, the Entrance is to the right. A Study and Guest Room is to the right of the entrance. The river bank is on the far right out of the picture. Designed in 1946, Frank Lloyd Wright originally specified brick, and designed a duplex for Doctors Alvin and William Miller with a clinic located between the two units. Only the single unit was built, and it was constructed of limestone instead of brick. Located on a river, the retaining wall and stairs to the boat inlet on the river bank became an important design element. Label pasted to verso: "W 20, USA Arch. The University Gallery. Northrop Memorial Auditorium, University of Minnesota. Minneapolis, Minnesota. Wright, Frank Lloyd. American, 1869--. Charles City, IA. – 1952. Res. Miller Entrance view. Photo by Andrews Photo 1519." Additional photographs are published in
Architecture in Chicago & Mid-America, Andrews, 1968, p.137. Photographed by Wayne Andrews. Acquired from the archives of the University of Minnesota.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#:
0910.52.0420
   
Date: Circa 1953 

Title: Alvin Miller Residence (1946 - S.289), Charles City, Iowa. Circa 1953.

Description: Viewed from the hall leading to the Workspace (kitchen). Was designed as a small one bedroom home, built on the banks of the Red Cedar River. Built of natural stone and cypress. Built-in cabinets and shelves are on the left. The Dining Room table is built into the stone wall in the center. Dining Room chairs were designed by Wright. A coffee table is built into the wall in the background. The ceiling above the Living Room is raised and clerestory windows allow in additional non-direct light. Two sets of floor to ceiling doors and two singles open outward in the Living Room on the right. Although the home was only 1,000 square feet, Wright featured it in "The Natural House". This photograph appeared on page 192. Also published in House & Home - April1955, pages 120-121. Photographed by Marc Neuhof. Gift from Randolph C. Henning. Wright Chairs.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 0987.45.06133

   
   
   
G. C. STOCKMAN RESIDENCE (1908 - S.139)
   
Date: 1910

Title: Representative Cement Houses (Digital Edition) (Published by the Universal Portland Cement Company, Chicago, Pittsburg)

Author: Universal Portland Cement Co.

Description: Preface: The object of this book is to indicate by illustrations and descriptions, one of the newer but very rapidly expanding fields of the application of cement, namely, in residence construction...




Page 81:
Dr. Stockman's Residence, Mason City, Iowa.
       A striking example of unique style of architecture, combining the attractive with the comfortable, is exemplified by the residence of Dr. G. C. Stockton, of Mason City, Iowa.
       It is a wooden frame house with an exterior coat of rough-cast white plaster. The foundation and basement floor are of solid concrete. The basement also contains a large cistern, made of concrete reinforced with wire.
       The contractor for the work was Mr. Christ Rye, of Mason City, and it was executed under the personal supervision of the architect, Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright. The cost of the house complete was $7,000.
       Dr. Stockton says that his home is thoroughly satisfactory, both as a home and as an investment, also that it is warm in winter, cool in summer, moisture-proof, and will need no painting or repairing. Includes one photographs of the Stockman Residence.

Also includes Brigham, Evans and Gilmore.
Original list price 50c.


Size: 6.25 x 9.25

Pages: Pp 128

S#:
0094.64.1119
   
Date: 1987

Title: G. C. Stockman Residence Mason City, Iowa 1987 (1908 - S.139).

Description: View of the exterior front elevation from the street. The Stockman house is derived from the "A Fireproof House of $5000." Clipping pasted to verso: "Dr. E.G. Stockman commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to built this Prairie-style house during a time of growth and prosperity in Mason city. Staff Photos by Ingrid Sundstrom." Stamped on clipping: "Jul 25 1987." Photographed by Ingrid Sundstrom.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

ST#:
1987.113.1019
   
Date: 1987

Title: G. C. Stockman Residence Mason City, Iowa 1987 (1908 - S.139).

Description: View from the Living Room toward the enclosed Veranda. The Stockman house is derived from the "A Fireproof House of $5000." Clipping pasted to verso: "Access to the sun room is provided by a row of three glass doors. It’s rare when a Wright building comes up for sale, but a four-bedroom house in Mason City, Iowa, will go on the auction block next Saturday." Stamped on clipping: "Jul 25 1987."

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

ST#:
1987.100.1217
   
Date: 1987

Title: G. C. Stockman Residence Mason City, Iowa 1987 (1908 - S.139).

Description: View of built-in cabinets. The design created by the window mullins is repeated in the cabinet doors. Hand written on verso: "
Frank Lloyd Wright Homes." Photograph caption pasted to verso: "This is one of two built-in cabinets the flank the row of doors leading from the living room to the sunroom." Stamped on clipping: "July 25, 1987." Clipping pasted to verso: "Built in 1908, the prairie style home was modeled after A Fireproof House of $5000, in LaGrange, Illinois., which Wright had designed a year earlier for the Ladies Home Journal. The mustard colored stucco house needs some repair and restoration, and sits in an increasingly commercial neighborhood, but it still..."

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

ST#:
1987.105.0918
   
Date: 1987

Title: G. C. Stockman Residence Mason City, Iowa 1987 (1908 - S.139).

Description: View of the corner of a room. Oak trim is original, acoustic tiles have been added to the ceiling and between the trim. Hand written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright Homes." Clipping pasted to verso: "The ceilings and upper walls still have the original oak woodwork. The acoustic tile was added later. During his 72-year career the redoubtable architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) designed more than 800 buildings. Only about 400 were built, and dozens are gone now. The survivors are regarded as historical treasures." Stamped on clipping: "Jul 25 1987."

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

ST#:
1987.104.0718
   
Date: Circa 1992

Title: George C. Stockman House Circa 1992 (1908 - S.139).

Description: 1) View from the Southeast. Set of eight postcards. In the April, 1907 issue of Ladies Home Journal, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed his "Fireproof House for $5000." Wright adapted this plan in 1908 for the Stockman House. The house went though a number of different owners, and in 1987, it was put up for auction, and purchased by the First United Methodist Church next door for parking. The River City Society was formed to save the house from destruction. In 1989 the house was moved a couple blocks away to its present location, remodeled, and in 1992, it was opened to the public for viewing. Text on verso: "View from the Southeast. George C. & Eleanor Stockman House. Frank Lloyd Wright - 1908. Mason City, Iowa."

Size: 6 x 4

ST#:
1992.129.0620-1
   
Date: Circa 1992

Title: George C. Stockman House Circa 1992 (1908 - S.139).

Description: 2) View from the Street. Set of eight postcards. In the April, 1907 issue of Ladies Home Journal, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed his "Fireproof House for $5000." Wright adapted this plan in 1908 for the Stockman House. The house went though a number of different owners, and in 1987, it was put up for auction, and purchased by the First United Methodist Church next door for parking. The River City Society was formed to save the house from destruction. In 1989 the house was moved a couple blocks away to its present location, remodeled, and in 1992, it was opened to the public for viewing. Text on verso: "Principle entrance, showing cantilevered portico roof and balcony. George C. & Eleanor Stockman House. Frank Lloyd Wright - 1908. Mason City, Iowa."

Size: 6 x 4

ST#: 1992.129.0620-2
   
Date: Circa 1992

Title: George C. Stockman House Circa 1992 (1908 - S.139).

Description: 3) View of the backyard from the Northeast. Set of eight postcards. In the April, 1907 issue of Ladies Home Journal, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed his "Fireproof House for $5000." Wright adapted this plan in 1908 for the Stockman House. The house went though a number of different owners, and in 1987, it was put up for auction, and purchased by the First United Methodist Church next door for parking. The River City Society was formed to save the house from destruction. In 1989 the house was moved a couple blocks away to its present location, remodeled, and in 1992, it was opened to the public for viewing. Text on verso: "Cutting garden viewed from Northeast, showing garden entrance to veranda. George C. & Eleanor Stockman House. Frank Lloyd Wright - 1908. Mason City, Iowa."

Size: 6 x 4

ST#: 1992.129.0620-3
   
Date: Circa 1992

Title: George C. Stockman House Circa 1992 (1908 - S.139).

Description: 4) View from the South end of the Living Room, with the Entrance in the background.. The fireplace is on the left. Set of eight postcards. In the April, 1907 issue of Ladies Home Journal, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed his "Fireproof House for $5000." Wright adapted this plan in 1908 for the Stockman House. The house went though a number of different owners, and in 1987, it was put up for auction, and purchased by the First United Methodist Church next door for parking. The River City Society was formed to save the house from destruction. In 1989 the house was moved a couple blocks away to its present location, remodeled, and in 1992, it was opened to the public for viewing. Text on verso: "South end of living room, showing Arts & Crafts furniture. George C. & Eleanor Stockman House. Frank Lloyd Wright - 1908. Mason City, Iowa."

Size: 6 x 4

ST#: 1992.129.0620-4
   
Date: Circa 1992

Title: George C. Stockman House Circa 1992 (1908 - S.139).

Description: 5) View from the North end of the Living Room. The doors to the Veranda are in the background. The fireplace is on the right. Set of eight postcards. In the April, 1907 issue of Ladies Home Journal, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed his "Fireproof House for $5000." Wright adapted this plan in 1908 for the Stockman House. The house went though a number of different owners, and in 1987, it was put up for auction, and purchased by the First United Methodist Church next door for parking. The River City Society was formed to save the house from destruction. In 1989 the house was moved a couple blocks away to its present location, remodeled, and in 1992, it was opened to the public for viewing. Text on verso: "South (sic... North) end of living room, showing Arts & Crafts furniture. George C. & Eleanor Stockman House. Frank Lloyd Wright - 1908. Mason City, Iowa."

Size: 6 x 4

ST#: 1992.129.0620-5
   
Date: Circa 1992

Title: George C. Stockman House Circa 1992 (1908 - S.139).

Description: 6) View of the Dining Room. Set of eight postcards. In the April, 1907 issue of Ladies Home Journal, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed his "Fireproof House for $5000." Wright adapted this plan in 1908 for the Stockman House. The house went though a number of different owners, and in 1987, it was put up for auction, and purchased by the First United Methodist Church next door for parking. The River City Society was formed to save the house from destruction. In 1989 the house was moved a couple blocks away to its present location, remodeled, and in 1992, it was opened to the public for viewing. Text on verso: "Dining room showing Wright’s furniture styling before 1909. George C. & Eleanor Stockman House. Frank Lloyd Wright - 1908. Mason City, Iowa."

Size: 6 x 4

ST#: 1992.129.0620-6
   
Date: Circa 1992

Title: George C. Stockman House Circa 1992 (1908 - S.139).

Description: 7) View of the Kitchen. Set of eight postcards. In the April, 1907 issue of Ladies Home Journal, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed his "Fireproof House for $5000." Wright adapted this plan in 1908 for the Stockman House. The house went though a number of different owners, and in 1987, it was put up for auction, and purchased by the First United Methodist Church next door for parking. The River City Society was formed to save the house from destruction. In 1989 the house was moved a couple blocks away to its present location, remodeled, and in 1992, it was opened to the public for viewing. Text on verso: "South half of Kitchen. George C. & Eleanor Stockman House. Frank Lloyd Wright - 1908. Mason City, Iowa."

Size: 6 x 4

ST#: 1992.129.0620-7
   
Date: Circa 1992

Title: George C. Stockman House Circa 1992 (1908 - S.139).

Description: 8) View of an upstairs bedroom. Set of eight postcards. In the April, 1907 issue of Ladies Home Journal, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed his "Fireproof House for $5000." Wright adapted this plan in 1908 for the Stockman House. The house went though a number of different owners, and in 1987, it was put up for auction, and purchased by the First United Methodist Church next door for parking. The River City Society was formed to save the house from destruction. In 1989 the house was moved a couple blocks away to its present location, remodeled, and in 1992, it was opened to the public for viewing. Text on verso: "Southeast bedroom, containing room’s original mission furniture. George C. & Eleanor Stockman House. Frank Lloyd Wright - 1908. Mason City, Iowa."

Size: 6 x 4

ST#: 1992.129.0620-8
   
   
   
LOWELL & AGNES WALTER RESIDENCE (1945 - S.284-285)
 
Date: 1951

Title: Sixty Years of Living Architecture, Palazzo Strozzi, Florence, 1951. .

Description: Display #109: "Walter House, Quasqueton, Iowa, 1949." Part of a set of forty B&W photographs by Ancillotti & Co., of the exhibition "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" held in Florence, Italy, 1951. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture: The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright" was a traveling exhibition of Wright's work, consisting of models, large photographs and original drawings. A Preview of the exhibition was held in Philadelphia at Gimbel Brothers Gallery in January, 1951. The world wide tour opened in Palazzo Strozzi Florence, Italy in June, 1951. Ancillotti & Company photographed many of the models and also documented the large photographs that were on display. Published in
Sixty Years of Living Architecture: The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright, Moser, 1952, p.70

Size: Original 9 x 7.25 B&W photograph.

S#: 0857.51.0221 -40
   
Date: 1954

Title: Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954 (Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation project #5427).

Description: A traveling exhibition of Wright's work, consisting of models, photographs and original drawings. A Preview of the exhibition was held in Philadelphia (January 1951). The world wide tour opened in Palazzo Strozzi Florence, Italy (June 1951). In "Sixty Years" (New York), Wright notes that from Florence the Exhibition traveled to "Switzerland, France, German and Holland". The Exhibition catalogs are dated: Paris (April 1952), Zurich (End of May 1952), Munich (May 16 - June 15, 1952), and Rotterdam (dated June 1, 1952). After two years in Europe the exhibition crossed the Atlantic to Mexico City, then to New York (1953). After an exhibition in Los Angeles, June, 1954, the final exhibition took place in Chicago, October, 1956. The Los Angeles exhibition premiere was held at Barnsdall Park’s Municipal Art Center on June 1, 1954, then open to the public from June 2 to July 11, and was extended to July 25, 1954. A temporary pavilion, similar to the pavilion in New York, was attached to the line of kennels that reached from the house to the garage. Exhibition Panel #109. "Walter House, Quasqueton, Iowa 1949." Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954. Interior view of the Walter House. Photographed by Loch Crane in June, 1954.

Size: B&W 2.25" negative, high res scan, and 8 x 8 B&W photograph

S#:
1045.42.1116-36
   
Date: 1982

Title: Cedar Rock - The Walter Residence - Quasqueton, Iowa  (Soft Cover)

Author: Iowa Department of Natural Resources

Description: Descriptive booklet describing the Walter Residence, Cedar Rock and its history. Includes six photographs.  Two Copies. (First Edition)

Size:

Pages: 12

ST#: 1982.16.0804, 1982.27.0405

   
   
   
MINNESOTA
 
There are a total of 13 homes and buildings located in Minnesota.
  BULBULIAN    ELAM    FASBENDER    KEYS    LAFOND    LINDHOLM RESIDENCE    LINDHOLM STATION    LITTLE II 
  LOVNESS    MCBEAN    NEILS    OLFELT    WILLEY  
 
  OTHER HOMES 
 
HERMAN T. FASBENDER MEDICAL CLINIC (1957 - S.424)
   
Date: Circa 1966

Title: Glass dish. Herman T. Fasbender Medical Clinic, Circa 1966 (1957 - S.424).

Description: Thomas Olson, an apprentice with Frank Lloyd Wright from 1952 to 1962, and friend of Dr. Werner Fasbender Jr., encouraged the doctor to commission Wright to design his medical clinic. Fasbender’s father, Herman Fasbender Sr., was also a doctor in Hastings. When Dr. Fasbender Jr. outgrew the space in 1966, he sold the clinic to Production Credit Association. In 1970, Production Credit sold the buildings to dentists John Thibodo and J. K. Kugler. Smoked glass dish produced by the Production Credit Association. Golf and red.

Size: 6.75 x 5.

S#: 1679.11.0915

   
   
   
KEYS RESIDENCE (1950 - S.321)
   
Date: 1952

Title: Thomas E. Keys Residence, Rochester, Minnesota, 1952 (1950 - S.321).

Description: Viewed from the Southeast. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1950. The carport is on the far left. The utility room is between the entrance and the carport. The Living room is between the entrance and the fireplace mass, and the bedrooms are on the right. Wright’s first design for the house in 1947 was totally different. It utilized the poured stone masonry, much like Taliesin West. Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph, 1942-1950, Pfeiffer, 1988/1990, p.164. To reduce construction costs, this second design utilized concrete blocks, and then was backfilled with berms just below the window level. Wright also designed this second version with a combination of a hipped and flat roof. Mounted to gray board. Label pasted to board: : "West 20, US Arch. Wright, Frank L. Rochester, Minn. Keys Res. 1952. Exterior. Photo by Andrews. 1538." Photographed by Wayne Andrews. One copy acquired from the archives of the University of Minnesota. One copy acquired from the archives of the Indiana University. Original 10 x 8 and 9.5 x 7.5 B&W Photographs.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W Photograph.

S#:
0910.55.0420, 0910.68.0920
   
   
LINDHOLM RESIDENCE (1952 - S.352)
   
Date: 1958

Title: R. W. Lindholm Residence 1958 (1952 - S.352).

Description: View looking East. Floor to ceiling doors open outward, and lead into the Living Room on the left. The bedroom wing in the background on the right. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Linnholm Residence in 1952 after their daughter suggested they speak to Wright about designing their home. She was a student at the University of Minnesota at the time, and one of her professors lived in the Wiley Residence (1933 - s.229) at the time. Four years later they would build the Wright design the gas station that was based on the design for an overhead gas station designed in 1932 for Broadacre City. The residence is a large "L" shaped Usonian home with the carport that forms a "T." Standard concrete blocks were used to construct the home, and tidewater cypress was used throughout finish the cabinetry and trim. The home was completed in 1956. Stamped on the verso: "Sep 9 1958" and "Roy Swan." Photographed by Roy Swan.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#:
1259.63.1019
   
Date: 1958

Title: R. W. Lindholm Residence 1958 (1952 - S.352).

Description: View looking North. The Living Room is to the far left, the bedroom wing is in the foreground on the right. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Linnholm Residence in 1952 after their daughter suggested they speak to Wright about designing their home. She was a student at the University of Minnesota at the time, and one of her professors lived in the Wiley Residence (1933 - s.229) at the time. Four years later they would build the Wright design the gas station that was based on the design for an overhead gas station designed in 1932 for Broadacre City. The residence is a large "L" shaped Usonian home with the carport that forms a "T." Standard concrete blocks were used to construct the home, and tidewater cypress was used throughout finish the cabinetry and trim. The home was completed in 1956. Stamped on the verso: "Sep 9 1958" and "Roy Swan." Clipping taped to verso: "Placement of house shows respect for site. The roof yields a space to accommodate graceful tree." Photographed by Roy Swan.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#:
1259.64.1019
   
Date: 1958

Title: R. W. Lindholm Residence 1958 (1952 - S.352).

Description: View looking Northwest.
Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Linnholm Residence in 1952 after their daughter suggested they speak to Wright about designing their home. She was a student at the University of Minnesota at the time, and one of her professors lived in the Wiley Residence (1933 - S.229) at the time. Four years later they would build the Wright design the gas station that was based on the design for an overhead gas station designed in 1932 for Broadacre City. The residence is a large "L" shaped Usonian home with the carport that forms a "T." Standard concrete blocks were used to construct a home, and tidewater cypress was used throughout finish the cabinetry and trim. Windows are also trimmed out in cypress. There is a built in desk at the far end of the Living Room, and the Dining Room is behind the camera. The Coffee table and stools appear to be Wright designed. It is most likely Mrs. Lindholm seated to the right. Stamped on the verso: "Oct 6 1958."

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#:
1259.54.1217
   
   
   
LINDHOLM SERVICE STATION (1956 - S.414)
 
Date: 1958

Title: Lindholm Service Station Under Construction 1958 (1956 - S. 414).

Description: Ray W. Lindholm’s first contact with Frank Lloyd Wright was for the design of his home just outside of Cloquet Minnesota called Mäntylä (1952 - S.353). R. W. Lindholm was the president of Lindholm Oil, Inc., a distributor of petroleum headquartered in Cloquet. The company owned several gas stations in Minnesota. Lindholm commissioned Wright again in 1956 to design a service station on Highway 33 in Cloquet. Wright utilized his earlier Broadacre City service station design, which he had exhibited as early as 1930. Construction began on April 27, 1958 and opened on October 31, 1958. Stamped on verso: "Roy Swan. Sep 9 1958." 1982 clipping taped to verso: "By Paul Goldberger. New York Times. There is, in gas stations, a kind of miniature history of American architecture - or at least there used to be. In the 1920s, 1930s, and even into the 1940s gasoline stations were built in the form of little colonial houses, Chinese pagodas, art deco palaces, Spanish mission haciendas and Greek temples. Almost every town had a different kind of building in which to purvey its gasoline, and architects seemed to struggle to make each station something of a landmark in its location... Caption: The Cloquet, Minn., station designed by Frank Lloyd Wright is shown under construction in 1958." The waiting room was in the glass enclosed second level. It was constructed of concrete block with a terne metal roof. This was Wright’s only service station. Photographed by Roy Swan.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 1259.39.1113

   
Date: 1958

Title: Lindholm Service Station 1958 (1956 - S. 414).

Description: Ray W. Lindholm’s first contact with Frank Lloyd Wright was for the design of his home just outside of Cloquet Minnesota called Mäntylä (1952 - S.353). R. W. Lindholm was the president of Lindholm Oil, Inc., a distributor of petroleum headquartered in Cloquet. The company owned several gas stations in Minnesota. Lindholm commissioned Wright again in 1956 to design a service station on Highway 33 in Cloquet. Wright utilized his earlier Broadacre City service station design, which he had exhibited as early as 1930. Construction began on April 27, 1958 and opened on October 31, 1958. The roof cantilevers out over the gas pumps. The waiting room is on the second floor, reached by the stairs on the left. The car at the gas pumps is a 1956 Desoto. Mounted to gray board. Label pasted to board: : "West 20, US Arch. Wright, Frank Lloyd. Cloquet, Minn. Lindholm Gas Station, 1957-58. General View. Andrew Photo #2775." Photographed by Wayne Andrews.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W Photograph.

S#: 1
259.71.0220
   
Date: Circa 1960

Title: Lindholm Service Station Circa 1960 (1956 - S. 414).

Description: Front: "Intersection Highway 33 and Cloquet Ave. Cloquet, Minn." Ray W. Lindholm’s first contact with Frank Lloyd Wright was for the design of his home just outside of Cloquet Minnesota called Mäntylä (1952 - S.353). R. W. Lindholm was the president of Lindholm Oil, Inc., a distributor of petroleum headquartered in Cloquet. The company owned several gas stations in Minnesota. Lindholm commissioned Wright again in 1956 to design a service station on Highway 33 in Cloquet. Wright utilized his earlier Broadacre City service station design, which he had exhibited as early as 1930. Construction began on April 27, 1958 and opened on October 31, 1958. The waiting room is in the glass enclosed second level. It was constructed of concrete block with a terne metal roof. This was Wright’s only service station. Back: "The world famous Master Architect Frank Lloyd Wright designed this beautiful service station. Only he could have had the daring and engineering skill to extend a Cantilever Canopy thirty-two feet out in space with little visible support. Cloquet is proud to have this copper sheathed masterpiece." Published by Plastichrome ® by Colourpicture Publishers, Inc., Boston 15, Mass., USA. #P30621.

Size: 5.4 x 3.4.

S#: 1458.45.0114

   
Date: 1990

Title: Lindholm Service Station 1990 (1956 - S. 414). Viewed from the Northwest.

Description: Ray W. Lindholm’s first contact with Frank Lloyd Wright was for the design of his home just outside of Cloquet Minnesota called Mäntylä (1952 - S.353). R. W. Lindholm was the president of Lindholm Oil, Inc., a distributor of petroleum headquartered in Cloquet. The company owned several gas stations in Minnesota. Lindholm commissioned Wright again in 1956 to design a service station on Highway 33 in Cloquet. Wright utilized his earlier Broadacre City service station design, which he had exhibited as early as 1930. Construction began on April 27, 1958 and opened on October 31, 1958. View of the North and West side. The roof is cantilevered over the pumps. The waiting room was in the glass enclosed second level and is reached via the stairs just to the right of the attendants office. It was constructed of concrete block with a copper metal roof. This was Wright’s only service station. Photographed by Jet Lowe in May 1990. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1990.97.1113

   
Date: 1990

Title: Lindholm Service Station 1990 (1956 - S. 414). Viewed from the Northwest.

Description: Ray W. Lindholm’s first contact with Frank Lloyd Wright was for the design of his home just outside of Cloquet Minnesota called Mäntylä (1952 - S.353). R. W. Lindholm was the president of Lindholm Oil, Inc., a distributor of petroleum headquartered in Cloquet. The company owned several gas stations in Minnesota. Lindholm commissioned Wright again in 1956 to design a service station on Highway 33 in Cloquet. Wright utilized his earlier Broadacre City service station design, which he had exhibited as early as 1930. Construction began on April 27, 1958 and opened on October 31, 1958. View of the North and West side. The roof is cantilevered over the pumps. The waiting room was in the glass enclosed second level and is reached via the stairs just to the right of the attendants office. It was constructed of concrete block with a copper metal roof. This was Wright’s only service station. Photographed by Jet Lowe in May 1990. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1990.98.1113

   
Date: 1990

Title: Lindholm Service Station 1990 (1956 - S. 414).

Description: Viewed from the Northwest. Ray W. Lindholm’s first contact with Frank Lloyd Wright was for the design of his home just outside of Cloquet Minnesota called Mäntylä (1952 - S.353). R. W. Lindholm was the president of Lindholm Oil, Inc., a distributor of petroleum headquartered in Cloquet. The company owned several gas stations in Minnesota. Lindholm commissioned Wright again in 1956 to design a service station on Highway 33 in Cloquet. Wright utilized his earlier Broadacre City service station design, which he had exhibited as early as 1930. Construction began on April 27, 1958 and opened on October 31, 1958. View of the front side. The roof is cantilevered over the pumps. The waiting room was in the glass enclosed second level and is reached via the stairs just to the right of the attendants office. It was constructed of concrete block with a copper metal roof. This was Wright’s only service station. Photographed by Jet Lowe in May 1990. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1990.99.1113

   
   
   
DONALD AND VIRGINIA LOVNESS RESIDENCE (1955 - S.391)
   
Date: 2020

Title: Growing Up Wright. Building a dream by hand with the world’s greatest architect. (Soft Cover. Author’s Proof) (Published by River Place Media, Inc., Stillwater, MN)

Author: Lovness, Lonnie

Description: Publisher’s description: "The story of Don and Virginia Lovness, who built two Frank Lloyd Wright-designed homes by hand. Wright called them his "Do-it-yourself couple", and they became close to Mrs. Wright and the entire Taliesin Fellowship over several decades. They were avid proponents of Wright's philosophies and became noted collectors of Oriental and re-Columbian art. Don re-created the Midway Garden "sprites", built Wright-designed furniture, and was instrumental in saving the Little house in Minnesota. Their close friendship with Wes Peters, John Howe, Aaron Green, Edgar Tafel and others provide wonderful stories, gleaned from interviews, Virginia's extensive notes and daughter Lonnie's family memories. Lonnie tells the story in 288 pages with over 600 photos. A final chapter details the extensive restoration of both houses and construction of a third Wright design on the property in 2018. Over 600 photos and drawings." We provided two photographs for this volume. Gift from the author. (First Edition).

Size: 9 x 9

Pages: Pp 287

ST#: 2020.06.0720
   
Date: 2020

Title: Growing Up Wright. Building a dream by hand with the world’s greatest architect. (Hard Cover DJ) (Published by River Place Media, Inc., Stillwater, MN)

Author: Lovness, Lonnie

Description: Publisher’s description: "The story of Don and Virginia Lovness, who built two Frank Lloyd Wright-designed homes by hand. Wright called them his "Do-it-yourself couple", and they became close to Mrs. Wright and the entire Taliesin Fellowship over several decades. They were avid proponents of Wright's philosophies and became noted collectors of Oriental and pre-Columbian art. Don re-created the Midway Garden "sprites", built Wright-designed furniture, and was instrumental in saving the Little house in Minnesota. Their close friendship with Wes Peters, John Howe, Aaron Green, Edgar Tafel and others provide wonderful stories, gleaned from interviews, Virginia's extensive notes and daughter Lonnie's family memories. Lonnie tells the story in 288 pages with over 600 photos. A final chapter details the extensive restoration of both houses and construction of a third Wright design on the property in 2018. Over 600 photos and drawings." We provided two photographs for this volume. Original list price $45.00. Gift from the author. (First Edition).

Size: 9.25 x 9.25

Pages: Pp 287

ST#: 2020.07.0720
   
   
   
HENRY J. NEILS RESIDENCE (1949 - S.314)
 
Date: 1952

Title: Henry J. Neils Residence, Minneapolis, Minn. Exterior 1952 (1949 - S.314).

Description: View of the exterior from the Southeast. Frank Lloyd Wright designed in Neils House in 1949. The bedrooms are on the left, the fireplace is in the center, the living room is on the right. Photographed by Wayne Andrews and published in Architecture in Chicago & Mid-America, Andrews, 1973, P.131. Label pasted to verso: "The University Gallery. Northrop Memorial Auditorium, University of Minnesota. Minneapolis, Minnesota. Artist: Wright, Frank Lloyd. American, 1869 –. Location: Minneapolis, Minn. – 1952. Res. Neils, Grand View. Photo By Andrews. #1531." Hand written on verso: "1531." Frank Lloyd Wright visited the Neils in 1954 and 1956. Photographed by Wayne Andrews.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#:
0910.45.0220
   
Date: 1952

Title: Henry J. Neils Residence, Minneapolis, Minn. Living Room 1952 (1949 - S.314).

Description: View of the Southeast corner of the Living Room. Frank Lloyd Wright designed in Neils House in 1949. The ceiling soars upward. The seating along the wall is built-in. The two tables in the center, short and tall, were designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. fireplace is in the center, the living room is on the right. Photographed by Wayne Andrews and published in Architecture in Chicago & Mid-America, Andrews, 1973, P.131. Label pasted to verso: "The University Gallery. Northrop Memorial Auditorium, University of Minnesota. Minneapolis, Minnesota. Artist: Wright, Frank Lloyd. American, 1869 –. Location: Minneapolis, Minn. – 1952. Res. Neils Window Seat. Photo By Andrews. #1535." Hand written on verso: "1535." Frank Lloyd Wright visited the Neils in 1954 and 1956. Photographed by Wayne Andrews.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 0910.46.0220
   
Date: 1952

Title: Henry J. Neils Residence, Minneapolis, Minn. Living Room 1952 (1949 - S.314).

Description: View of the Living Room Fireplace. Frank Lloyd Wright designed in Neils House in 1949. The seating along the wall to the left is built-in. The fireplace mass is cantilevered out over the opening. The stairs up to the main portion of the house is in the background just to the right of the fireplace. The Workspace is to the right. Label pasted to verso: "The University Gallery. Northrop Memorial Auditorium, University of Minnesota. Minneapolis, Minnesota. Artist: Wright, Frank Lloyd. American, 1869 –. Location: Minneapolis, Minn. – 1952. Res. Neils Fireplace. Photo By Andrews. #1536." Hand written on verso: "1536." Frank Lloyd Wright visited the Neils in 1954 and 1956. Photographed by Wayne Andrews.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 0910.47.0220
   
Date: 1953

Title: Henry J. Neils Residence 1953 (1949 - S.314).

Description: View of the Living Room. Floor to ceiling windows and doors are on the left. Built-in seating is to the right. There is a small Wright designed table near the built-in seating, and two Wright designed hassocks or seats. Note the round kettle hanging in the fireplace. Label pasted to verso: "The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. The Neils House - Minneapolis, Minnesota." Stamped on verso: "Credit Photograph to P. E. Guerrero." and "Filed Oct 30 1953." Photographed by Pedro Guerrero. 9 photographs by Guerrero, of the Neils Residence were published in the November 1953 issue of House & Home. This image was printed in color p.125.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#:
0987.96.0218
   
Date: 1954

Title: Wright visits Henry J Neils Residence 1954 (1949 - S.314).

Description: Frank Lloyd Wright speaks at the University of Minnesota, October 5, 1954, then visits the Neils Residence. Label pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright, center... house guest of Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Neils (Niles) of 2801 Burnham Blvd. He’s chairman of the board and treasurer, Flour City Ornamental Iron Company. Date: 5 October 54. Time 10:30-10:45. About: Frank Lloyd Wright in town for lecture at University of Minnesota." Stamped on verso: "Oct 7 1954."

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 1045.26.1114

   
Date: 1954

Title: Wright visits Henry J. Neils Residence 1954 (1949 - S.314).

Description: Frank Lloyd Wright speaks at the University of Minnesota, October 5, 1954, then visits the Neils Residence. Label pasted to verso: "Made by: Ted. Date: 5 October 54. Time: 1030-1045. Ordered by: pafiolis. Where Made: 2801 Burnham Blvd. What is it About? Frank Lloyd Wright in town for lecture at University of Minnesota. Names: Frank Lloyd Wright - stands in front of one of 3,500 fireplaces he’s designed into 670 projects." Stamped on label: "Oct 6-1954."

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 1045.39.0416

   
Date: 1956

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright stands next to aerial view of Minneapolis, November 26, 1956.

Description: Frank Lloyd Wright speaks his mind in Minneapolis. Clipping pasted to verso: "Architect Frank Lloyd Wright  looked at Minneapolis Monday (11/26/56). Shown with aerial photo at Minneapolis-Honeywell hanger. Architect speaks his mind." Stamped on verso: "Donald Black. Nov 26 1956." He also visited the Henry J. Neils Residence (1949 - S.314). Photographed by Donald Black. Acquired from the archives of the Minneapolis Tribune.

Size: 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 1147.66.0115

   
Date: 1956

Title: Citizens League of Minneapolis 1956.

Description: Frank Lloyd Wright, Teacher and Architect. Program for the 5th Annual Meeting of the Citizens League of Minneapolis and Hennepin County. Leamington Hotel, November 27, 1956. Biographical Sketch: One of the founders of modern architecture, Frank Lloyd Wright is regarded throughout the world as one of the greatest architects of the 20th century. "If I were to apply genius to only one living American", wrote the late Alexander Woollcott, some time ago, "I would have to save it up for Frank Lloyd Wright"... Includes two photographs and one illustration.

Size: 11 x 16 folded to 5.5 x 8.125. Slip sheet 5.25 x 7.125.

S#: 1147.67.0315

   
Date: 1956

Title: Wright visits Henry J. Neils Residence (1949 - S.314).

Description: Label taped to verso: "Date: Nov 27, 1956. Subject: Frank Lloyd Wright leaving the house of Henry Neils, 2801 Burnham Blvd, Minneapolis, Minn. Photographer: Paul Siegel." Reported in the November 28, 1956, Minneapolis Tribune, (yesterday) "Frank Lloyd Wright, the 87-year-old champion of American modernist architecture, visited the Twin Cities to address the annual meeting of the Citizens League of Minneapolis and Hennepin County. He picked up ammunition for his speech during a tour earlier in the day, visiting the new Southdale shopping center in Edina, Prudential building in Minneapolis and other landmarks. He didn’t have many kind things to say about anything, including our climate. ‘Minneapolis is just too far north,’ he said. But he did praise the Twin Cities’ lakes and parks as a ‘beautiful gift from nature.’ And he managed to recall ‘with a chuckle’ his 1926 visit to Minneapolis during which he landed in jail in a dispute with his estranged wife. ‘Nothing came of it,’ he said, somewhat cryptically." He visited the Neils Residence during his tour.

Size: Original 9 x 7.25 B&W photograph.

S#: 1147.49.0613

   
Date: 1956

Title: Wright at 89. Circa 1956.

Description: Wright visits Henry J. Neils Residence (1949 - S.314). Stamped on verso: "Paul Siegel," and "Nov 27 1956." Published in the November 28, 1956, Minneapolis Tribune, "Frank Lloyd Wright, the 87-year-old champion of American modernist architecture, visited the Twin Cities to address the annual meeting of the Citizens League of Minneapolis and Hennepin County. He picked up ammunition for his speech during a tour earlier in the day, visiting the new Southdale shopping center in Edina, Prudential building in Minneapolis and other landmarks. He didn’t have many kind things to say about anything, including our climate. ‘Minneapolis is just too far north,’ he said. But he did praise the Twin Cities’ lakes and parks as a ‘beautiful gift from nature.’ And he managed to recall ‘with a chuckle’ his 1926 visit to Minneapolis during which he landed in jail in a dispute with his estranged wife. ‘Nothing came of it,’ he said, somewhat cryptically." He visited the Neils Residence during his tour.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 1147.58.0514

   
Date: 1956

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright visits Henry J. Neils Residence 1956 (1949 - S.314).

Description: Wright sits in front of fireplace. Kettle in background. Clipping pasted to background: "A Tour and a Lecture. For Him Wright Is Kind To City. By Frank Murray. Minneapolis Star Staff Writer. Frank Lloyd Wright, dean of American architecture and ancient foe of the ‘city concept,’ was taking a good long look at Minneapolis today. In a manner of speaking, you could say he was praising it with faint damns - and quite a few explosive ones. (Caption) Frank Lloyd Wright in Henry Neils’ Home. Kettle in background was his idea." Stamped on verso: "1956 Nov 27."

Size: 8 x 9.75 B&W photograph.

S#: 1205.62.1214

 

 

 

   
Date: 1971

Title: Henry J. Neils Residence 1971 (1949 - S.314).

Description: View of the Neils Residence from the South. Label pasted to verso: "Star Tribune. Henry Neils Res., Note: the address is 2801 Burnham Blvd." Hand written on label: "Designed by
Frank Lloyd Wright." Stamped on verso: "Donald Black. May 6 1971." Photographed by Donald Black. Acquired from the archives of the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

Size: Original 11 x 7 B&W photograph.

S#:
1867.19.0918
   
   
   
WILLEY RESIDENCE (1933 - S.229)
   
Date: Circa 1934

Title: Willey Residence, Scheme II, 1934.

Description: Part of a set of six photographs. The drawing for Willey Residence Scheme II was Wright's Project #3401, which would indicate drawings were completed in 1934. Walls are complete, trellis is under construction. The roof of the master bedroom in the background is complete. Malcolm and Nancy Willey moved in to their new house in December 1934. This image of the set of six helps date the other five. (A thank you to Robert Barros for identifying this image.)

Size: Original 7 x 5 B&W photograph.

S#: 0370.08.0514

   
Date: 1934

Title: Malcolm E. Willey House, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1934 (1933 - S.229).

Description: View of the Willey Residence from the Southwest. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1933. It was constructed of brick with cypress trim. Located on a bluff over looking the Mississippi River, the view was marred by the construction of I-94 on its Southern border. This appears to be taken near the completing of the house. Grass has not yet been planted. Stairs and the Terrace have not yet been completed. An empty Coke bottle sits between the detached garage and the house. The wall that runs along the East side of the property line has not been installed. Mounted to gray board. Label pasted to board: "182. M666. B12W. 41. Minneapolis, Minn. House of Malcolm Willey. Front Elevation. View showing the semi detached garage at extreme left. The wall which cuts off the view to the east has not yet been built in this view. 1934. Architect: Frank Lloyd Wright." Small label pasted to verso: "Gift of B. Simms." Caption pasted to verso: "This house has no attic, and no excavation excepting under the kitchen. Storage room is over the garage. In the skylights, French doors to the terrace, and the odd triangular windows between the eaves and the north wall, there has been an abundant use of glass; designed to bring the outside in. The glass screen separating the kitchen from the dining and living room is to create the feeling of one whole unit. All lighting is indirect. The building is 90 feet from one side to the end of the garage at the other." Acquired from the archives of the University of Minnesota.

Size: Original 6.5 x 4.5 B&W Photograph.

S#:
0376.04.0420
   
Date: 1934

Title: Malcolm E. Willey House, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1934 (1933 - S.229).

Description: View of the Willey Residence Dining Room. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1933. It was constructed of brick with cypress trim. Located on a bluff over looking the Mississippi River, the view was marred by the construction of I-94 on its Southern border. One detail that is of interest is the brick floor. The brick floor is consistent with the construction of the brick walls. The brick flooring continues to the exterior patios and stairs. The furniture and built-ins were designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Label pasted to board: "182. M666. B12W. 75. Minneapolis, Minn. House of Malcolm Willey. Dining Unit in the Main Room. Square table in center, cupboards and shelves are all designed as a part of the house. Behind the shelves and glass partition is the kitchen. 1934. Architect: Frank Lloyd Wright." Small label pasted to verso: "Gift of B. Simms." Published in In The Nature of Materials, 1942, Plate 318. Acquired from the archives of the University of Minnesota. See additional Wright furniture...

Size: Original 6.5 x 4.5 B&W Photograph.

S#:
0376.05.0420
   
Date: 1937

Title: Malcolm E. Willey Residence Circa 1937 (1933 - S.229).

Description: Exterior view of from the Southeast. The carport is on the far left, Living Room in the center, Bedrooms on the far right. Designed in 1933 by Frank Lloyd Wright for Malcolm Willey and completed in 1934. Willey was an administrator at the University of Minnesota. This Usonian design was actually the second design Wright created for the Willeys. Copy slide of photograph published in the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, p.31. Caption: "View made in early November of Malcolm Willey House... Looking to the North, Showing glazed doors to the living room and the wood trellis over." Also published in The Natural House, Wright, 1954, p.76; and In The Nature of Materials, Hitchcock, 1942, plate 316.

Size: Original 4 x 3.25 Magic Lantern Glass Slide.

S#:
0429.43.1118
   
Date: 1937

Title: Malcolm E. Willey Residence Circa 1937 (1933 - S.229).

Description: Interior view of Living Room Fireplace from the Southwest. The Dining Area is to the left out of frame. The Gallery, leading to the Bedrooms is in the center. Designed in 1933 by Frank Lloyd Wright for Malcolm Willey and completed in 1934. Willey was an administrator at the University of Minnesota. This Usonian design was actually the second design Wright created for the Willeys. Copy slide of photograph published in the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, p.30. Caption: "Red brick fireplace in living room of Malcolm Willey House... Same alternating brick courses in floors and walls... Iron crane and inserted red tile." Also published in The Natural House, Wright, 1954, p.75.

Size: Original 4 x 3.25 Magic Lantern Glass Slide.

S#:
0429.42.1118
   
Date: 1951

Title: Sixty Years of Living Architecture, Palazzo Strozzi, Florence, 1951.

Description: Display #53: "Project for the Willey House, Minneapolis, Minn., 1932. Model for a ‘Usonian’ house." Text bottom left: "Fot. Ancillotti & C. - Milano - Via Solferino, 3 - Tel. 89.85.84." Part of a set of forty B&W photographs by Ancillotti & Co., of the exhibition "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" held in Florence, Italy, 1951. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture: The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright" was a traveling exhibition of Wright's work, consisting of models, large photographs and original drawings. A Preview of the exhibition was held in Philadelphia at Gimbel Brothers Gallery in January, 1951. The world wide tour opened in Palazzo Strozzi Florence, Italy in June, 1951. Ancillotti & Company photographed many of the models and also documented the large photographs that were on display.

Size: Original 9 x 7.25 B&W photograph.

S#: 0857.51
.0221 -12
   
Date: 1953

Title: Malcolm E. Willey Residence 1953 (1933 - S.229).

Description: Designed in 1933 by
Frank Lloyd Wright for Malcolm Willey and completed in 1934. Willey was an administrator at the University of Minnesota. This Usonian design was actually the second design Wright created for the Willeys. Stamped on Verso: "Oct 14 1953." Wiley sold the home in 1963. Clipping pasted to verso (1963): "A house in Minneapolis, one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s most noted designs, was sold recently for far less than it could have brought. It’s not that the late architect’s work is now down-graded; on the contrary, although he was been dead more than four years, interest in his designs is as acute as ever. The house at 255 S.E. Bedford St. Was sold for a relative song because the original owner, Malcolm M. Willey, former academic vice president at the University of Minnesota, was mainly interested in finding someone who loved it to live in it." Stamped on verso: "Engraving. 1963 Nov 13." Also stamped on verso: "Artists. 1963 Nov 13." Clipping pasted to verso stamped Jul 30 1968: "There are two housed designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in Minneapolis and seven others throughout the state. The house pictured, built in 1934, is at 255 S.E. Bedford St." Clipping pasted to verso stamped Nov 17 1968: "Bedford St. House: ‘It Dramatizes Distant Vistas.’ "

Size: Original 10 x 7.75 B&W Photograph.

S#:
0987.95.1217
   
Date: 1953

Title: 2) #53: Willey House Model (1), Project for the Willey House, Minneapolis, Miss, 1932.

Description: Malcolm Willey House, Scheme 1 (project 1932). Although not called a Usonian design in 1932, it could be called an early forerunner to the design. The description in the 1953 "Sixty Yeats" (New York) catalog is "Model for a ‘Usonian’ house." Scheme 1 was two stories. The Malcolm Willey House (1933 - S.229), Scheme 2, built in 1933, was one story and built three years before the Jacobs Residence (1936 - S.234) which many call Wright’s first Usonian House.

Size: Faded 4.5 x3.25 sepia tone photograph.

S#: 0987.50.0813

   
Date: 1953

Title: 3) #53: Willey House Model (2), Project for the Willey House, Minneapolis, Miss, 1932.

Description: Malcolm Willey House, Scheme 1 (project 1932). Although not called a Usonian design in 1932, it could be called an early forerunner to the design. The description in the 1953 "Sixty Yeats" (New York) catalog is "Model for a ‘Usonian’ house." Scheme 1 was two stories. The Malcolm Willey House (1933 - S.229), Scheme 2, built in 1933, was one story and built three years before the Jacobs Residence (1936 - S.234) which many call Wright’s first Usonian House.

Size: Faded 4.5 x3.25 sepia tone photograph.

S#: 0987.51.0813

   
Date: 1984

Title: Malcolm E. Willey Residence, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Circa 1984 (1933 - S.229).

Description: 1) Not dated. Exterior view of from the Southeast. Although not considered Wright’s first "Usonian" house, it has many of the characteristics. It proceeded the Jacobs I by three years. The carport is on the far left, Living Room in the center, Bedrooms to the far right. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1933 for Malcolm Willey and completed in 1934. Willey was an administrator at the University of Minnesota. This design was actually the second design Wright created for the Willeys. Text on sleeve: "Mod: Arch: US: Wright: Malcolm Willy House. Ext. 1934. Minneapolis, Minn. Sandak AC 443/84." Set of two 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 7 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#:
1984.59.0121 -1
   
Date: 1984

Title: Malcolm E. Willey Residence, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Circa 1984 (1933 - S.229).

Description: Not dated. View of the Living Room fireplace from the from the West. Although not considered Wright’s first "Usonian" house, it has many of the characteristics. It proceeded the Jacobs I by three years. The iron brackets within the fireplace includes a red square. A pair of Nakomis and Nakoma sculptures is setting above the entrance to the Gallery (Hall). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1933 for Malcolm Willey and completed in 1934. Willey was an administrator at the University of Minnesota. This design was actually the second design Wright created for the Willeys. Text on sleeve: "Wright, Frank Lloyd: Malcolm Willy House. L.R. 1934. Minneapolis, Minn. AC 444." Set of two 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 7 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#: 1984.59.0121 -2
   
   
   
MINNESOTA MONTHLY
     
Date: 1994

Title: Minnesota Monthly - Oct 1994 (Published monthly by Minnesota Monthly, on behalf of Minnesota Public Radio, St. Paul, Minn.)

Author: McBride, Elizabeth

Description: "The Wright Cabin For Skiing. Cross-Country Ski and Share an Architect’s Dream at the Seth Peterson Cottage... The Seth Peterson Cottage, near Lake Delton, Wisconsin, is the only Wright house that can be rented for overnight stays. Compact (880 square feet) yet spacious, serene yet powerful, in Wright’s inimitable way, the cottage offers an extraordinary opportunity to learn what’s behind all the fuss over this architect..." Includes two photographs. Original cover price $2.50.

Size: 8 x 11

Pages: Pp 62-63

ST#: 1994.88.0715

   
   
   
MINNEAPOLIS TRIBUNE
   
Date: 1972

Title: Minneapolis Tribune Picture Magazine - August 20, 1972 (Published weekly by the Minneapolis Tribune, Minneapolis, Minnesota)

Author: Meier, Peg

Description: "A gem of a room finds a museum setting." In 1969, the long time owners of the Francis Little Residence II, in Wayzata, Minnesota was put on the market. After three years, and no interest, they decided to sell the house piece-meal instead of demolishing it. It was purchased by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and they reinstalled the Living Room in the American Wing. "This is the most beautiful room I have ever seen..." Morrison Heckscher, Curator of the American Wing. Includes 11 photographs of the original house in its original setting by Earl Seubert and Regene Radniecki, plus one portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright. From the Jack Howe estate, a gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 10.75 x 12.75

Pages: Pp Cover 6-12, 15, 20-21

S#:
1909.52.0319
   
Date: 1973

Title: Minneapolis Tribune Picture Magazine - April 1, 1973 (Published weekly by the Minneapolis Tribune, Minneapolis, Minnesota)

Author: Premack, Frank

Description: "Life at Taliesin West... Fourteen years after Wright’s death, the spirit of the master architect still dominates the Taliesin Fellowship, a community of a few dozen people who spend nine months of the year at Taliesin West, a stone-and-red-beamed enclave in the desert eight miles from Scottsdale, and the summer at Spring Green, Wisconsin, at another Taliesin Wright built...." Includes 16 photographs by Kent Kobersteen of Mrs. Wright, Taliesin West and the apprentices that work there, including: Jeffrey Scott Will, Dennis Tuberty, Mrs. Kamnal Amin and Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer. Two copies from the Jack Howe estate, a gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 10.75 x 12.75

Pages: Pp Cover, 30-35, 38

S#:
1940.23.0319, 1940.24.0319
   
   
   
MISSOURI
   
   BOTT    COMMUNITY CHURCH    KRAUS    PAPPAS    SONDERN  
   
   
KRAUS
 
Date: 2016

Title: Ladue News - April 8, 2016 (Special bound pull-out section) (Published by Ladue News, St. Louis, MO)

Author: Nay, Brittany

Description: Article on the Kraus House. "The ‘Wright’ Design. The Rich Roots of the Frank Lloyd Wright House in Ellsworth Park Are a Nod to His Democratic Vision of Modern American Architecture. Nestled amid 10 1/2 wooded acres on the outskirts of Kirkwood, Missouri, sits a little known architectural gem designed by a well-known architect. As guest pass through the properties red gate and across the brick homes threshold, they are immersed in the epitome of modern architecture. It's The Frank Lloyd Wright house in Ellsworth Park (FLWHEP), and its roots run deep in St. Louis. Built for artist Russell Krauss and his wife, Ruth, the architectural framework of the 1900 square-foot house at 120 N. Ballass Road. was finished in the late 1955, but it would be another decade before it's interior was complete. "Russell had long admired Wright’s designs, but did not think he [could] afford one of his houses," says Jean King Hession, an architectural historian, writer and curator specializing in midcentury modernism. "After reading [a 1948] article in House Beautiful magazine, in which Loren Pope..." Includes five photographs of the Kraus Residence.

Size: 10.75 x 14

Pages: Pp 31-33

ST#:
2016.29.0818
   
   
   
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